Free Trade threatens custom land in the Pacific | Pacific Network on Globalisation

“Custom land is so central to life in the Pacific Islands that its importance cannot be overstated. Yet through the eyes of free trade agreements it is seen as a barrier to investment, something that needs to be challenged,” commented PANG Campaigner Adam Wolfenden.

The briefing paper outlines many of the common questions about free trade and what it means for custom land in the Pacific Islands.

“Previous attempts to privatise land in the Pacific have been meet with a strong refusal by Islanders. What we’re seeing now is free trade advocates using these agreements to secure control over the usage of the land, which can in effect mean that custom decisions about land use are undermined” added Mr Wolfenden.

“We’re seeing this in Vanuatu where its Trade in Services commitments at the World Trade Organization (WTO) mean the government’s ability to specifically support and nurture land use for Indigenous enterprise, such as local burree owners or other tourist accommodation, can only happen if it gives the same support to foreign investors” continued Mr Wolfenden.

via Free Trade threatens custom land in the Pacific | Pacific Network on Globalisation.

The rise of Predator Economics -The Common Sense CanadianThe Common Sense Canadian

Canadians are forever being informed, explicitly or implicitly, that the solution to the crisis of the day, or decade, is a freedom-sounding word called “privatization”.  This, the free-marketeers tell us, will solve our problems.

The reality is invariably the opposite.  “Privatization” – also known as bailed-out, highly subsidized corporatism – is in fact the problem, not the solution.

Furthermore, the crises being addressed are often manufactured for the express purpose of rolling out a parasitical regime of corporatization that profits from calamity, even as its “host”, the public, is fleeced.

via The rise of Predator Economics -The Common Sense CanadianThe Common Sense Canadian.

Joseph A. Palermo: Pedagogy of the Depressed

Whenever David Brooks and Thomas Friedman begin singing from the same hymnal you can bet the next public policy catastrophe is knocking at the door. This time around theyve become boosters for online college courses as a panacea to cure the ills afflicting public colleges and universities. Brooks and Friedmans new interest in higher education means that Very Serious People are lining up to hand over yet another public good to the shock doctrine of privatization.

via Joseph A. Palermo: Pedagogy of the Depressed.