Dakota Access protests poised to become political debacle for American oil and gas industry – The American Energy News : The American Energy News

Industry leaders, including Kelcy Warren, have mishandled Dakota Access pipeline protest right from the beginning Six weeks ago, I warned that the Dakota Access pipeline protest was going to be the next Keystone XL issue for the American oil and gas industry. I was wrong. It’s going to be much worse. Eco-activists have acknowledged that opposing …

Source: Dakota Access protests poised to become political debacle for American oil and gas industry – The American Energy News : The American Energy News

Preventing climate change and adapting to it are not morally equivalent | Grist

Climate hawks are familiar with the framing of climate policy credited to White House science advisor John Holdren, to wit: We will respond to climate change with some mix of mitigation, adaptation, and suffering; all that remains to be determined is the mix.It’s a powerful bit of language. It makes clear that not acting is itself a choice — a choice in favor of suffering.But in another way, Holdren’s formulation obscures an important difference between mitigation reducing greenhouse gas emissions to prevent climate effects and adaptation changing infrastructure and institutions to cope with climate effects. It makes them sound fungible, as though a unit of either can be traded in for an equivalent unit of suffering. That’s misleading. They are very different, not only on a practical level but morally.

via Preventing climate change and adapting to it are not morally equivalent | Grist.

Huge university salaries condemned – University World News

Scottish universities employ 88 people who earn the same as the First Minister’s £140,000 (US$213,000) salary or more, reports icScotland. Just two principals across the 18 institutions earn less than the leader of the Scottish government, according to figures from the National Union of Students (NUS).

via Huge university salaries condemned – University World News.

The same may be said for North American universities, most notably the University of Alberta whose salary outranks any other because, it has been said, it is important that the president’s salary reflects the prestige and excellence of the institution.

In an age and time when we value only that for which the highest cost is extracted, outrageously high salaries may be seen as making sense of a particular kind. The question must then be asked about the kinds of values that such institutions wish to and should, uphold and the message they wish to convey about values, morals and society, most especially given their traditional function role as the social, political and moral conscience of the nation.