Killing the Koala and Poisoning the Prairie . Corie J. A. Bradshaw and Paul R. Ehrlich. | ConservationBytes.com

The gloves come off We are two scientists who are sufficient furious at the state of our global environment and society to forget about political correctness. We are willing, even eager, to attempt to recruit you into the growing mass of people who are determined to divert society from its “business as usual” path toward disaster manifested already by morbid coral reefs, climate disruption, extinctions, tree die-offs, industrial toxification, loss of pollinators, and declining fish stocks. We are disgusted with the way politicians and the press ignore the realities that civilisation is sliding toward irreversible environmental damage, and that universities are not providing any leadership to change our course because of chronic underfunding, a reticence to embrace true inter-disciplinarity to solve society’s complex problems, and a lack of environmental training across all disciplines. We are tired of the erosion of public education in both nations, especially in science, technology and sustainable agriculture, overlooked or encouraged by politicians who would never be elected by a public that had a basic understanding of environmental science.

Source: Killing the Koala and Poisoning the Prairie | ConservationBytes.com

“Humanity at risk “: climate scientist Schellnhuber speaks at the Vatican — from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research

Pope Francis’ much anticipated encyclical “Laudato Si” on inequality and the environment mirrors not only religious insights but also the findings of climate science. “Not the poor but the wealthy are putting our planet, and ultimately humanity, at risk,” said Hans Joachim Schellnhuber, director of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), at the presentation of the encyclical in the Vatican today. “Those who profited least from the exploitation of fossil fuels and contributed least to greenhouse-gas emissions are hit hardest by global warming impacts, unless we strongly reduce emissions.” Schellnhuber is the only scientist who has been invited to speak, alongside Cardinal Peter Turkson. 

“Humanity at risk “: climate scientist Schellnhuber speaks at the Vatican — PIK Research Portal.

Gitxaala Thanks Tsilhqot’in and Calls on Crown to Live Up to Its Own Laws

Gitxaala Thanks Tsilhqot’in and Calls on Crown to Live Up to Its Own Lawsby ahnationtalk on June 27, 2014June 26, 2014KITKATLA, BRITISH COLUMBIA–June 26, 2014 – Gitxaala extends its thanks to the Tsilhqot’in for bringing the important issue of aboriginal rights and title to the forefront and gaining a significant victory for aboriginal people – especially for nations such as ours who have not ceded their aboriginal title.In its decision today, the Supreme Court of Canada has made it clear that aboriginal title is very much like private property rights – at its core it is the right to decide what use is made of our land and waters.

via Gitxaala Thanks Tsilhqot’in and Calls on Crown to Live Up to Its Own Laws.

Uncertainty makes tackling climate change more urgent – University World News

Scientific uncertainty has been described as a ‘monster’ that defies our best efforts to understand the Earth’s climate system. Commentators and politicians routinely cite uncertainty about the severity of climate change impacts to justify their opposition to mitigation measures such as a price on carbon.

What is the appropriate response to uncertainty about the future of the Earth’s climate? Is there too much uncertainty to warrant action? Should we wait for more certainty?

On the face of it, complacency in the light of uncertainty might appear tolerable or even advisable.

However, a mathematical analysis of the implications of uncertainty about future temperature increases shows otherwise.

via Uncertainty makes tackling climate change more urgent – University World News.

The Future Must Be Green, Red, Black and Female | Deep Green Resistance New York

NOVEMBER 13, 2013 BY DEEPGREENRESISTANCENEWYORK

The Future Must Be Green, Red, Black and Female

By Robert Jensen / Truth-Out

The human species must acknowledge that any future that allows us to retain our humanity will jettison capitalism, patriarchy and white supremacy – and be based on an ecological worldview, says Jensen.

(These remarks were prepared for a private conference on sustainability, where the participants critiqued corporate farming, “big ag,” and “big pharma” and industrialized medicine. There was agreement about the need for fundamental change in economic/political/social systems, but no consensus on the appropriate analysis of those systems and their interaction.)

The future of the human species – if there is to be a future – must be radically green, red, black and female.

If we take this seriously – a human future, that is, if we really care about whether there will be a human future – each one of us who claims to care has to be willing to be challenged, radically. How we think, feel, and act – it’s all open to critique, and no one gets off easy, because everyone has failed. Individually and collectively, we have failed to create just societies or a sustainable human presence on the planet. That failure may have been inevitable – the human with the big brain may be an evolutionary dead-end – but still it remains our failure. So, let’s deal with it, individually and collectively.

via The Future Must Be Green, Red, Black and Female | Deep Green Resistance New York.

Shell presses ahead with world’s deepest offshore oil well | Business | The Guardian

Shell presses ahead with world’s deepest offshore oil well | Business | The Guardian.

No end to our insanity in sight? What, after all, could possibly go wrong?