Blue dots becoming symbol for First Nations Education Act resistance – Aboriginal – CBC

I am a “blue dot” member.

 

A “blue dot” movement has taken the Twittersphere and Facebook by storm. Photographs of Indigenous people with a blue dot on their chest are being posted on social media.

It follows what happened at a joint announcement on the First Nations Control of First Nations Education Act (FNEA).

The proposed legislation was announced in the Kainai First Nation on the Blood Tribe Reserve in Alberta. Prime Minister Stephen Harper, Assembly of First Nations National Chief Shawn Atleo and Aboriginal Affairs Minister Bernard Valcourt held a ceremony in the community to “seal the deal.”

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Twila Singer and her two children attended the event.

Historical photos like this one of the American Indian Movement are showing up with blue dots. Christi Belcourt is using old photos of vocal figures to make a point with the blue dot campaign. (@christibelcourt/Twitter)

“We were separated at the door and given either a blue dot or a yellow dot. The blue dots were uninvited guests and were ushered to the gymnasium, and the invited guests were the yellow dots and they were brought to the auditorium where the dignitaries were.”

via Blue dots becoming symbol for First Nations Education Act resistance – Aboriginal – CBC.

#IdleNoMore’s defiant brand of feminism | System Change Not Climate Change

Posted on March 7, 2014 by Peter Rugh

Sovereignty, ecology, and decolonizing the female body

Ahead of International Women’s Day this Saturday, Ragina Johnson and Brian Ward spoke with Alex Wilson, a leading organizer for Idle No More and a member Opaskwayak Cree Nation in Manitoba, Canada. In a wide ranging conversation, Wilson discusses the historical and continuing relationship between the colonization of people and land and the colonization of women’s bodies. She first begins, however, by outlining the impact tar sands oil extraction has on indigenous communities in Canada and the threat tar sands expansion projects like the Keystone XL pipeline pose to all of us.

via #IdleNoMore’s defiant brand of feminism | System Change Not Climate Change.