They’re not making it anymore RT — Renegade Inc.

Land is a necessity for human existence and remains the original source of all wealth. Yet bankers, economists, and politicians have simplistically lumped land and capital together, so apparently now they mean the same thing.

So why, as a society, have we chosen to eliminate land from the economic calculus? The consequences have been far reaching.

Host Ross Ashcroft is joined by writers and economists Laurie MacFarlane and Josh Ryan-Collins. to talk about this.

Its with listening to.

Source: They’re not making it anymore RT — Renegade Inc.

Consume more, conserve more: sorry, but we just can’t do both | George Monbiot | The Guardian

We can have it all: that is the promise of our age. We can own every gadget we are capable of imagining – and quite a few that we are not. We can live like monarchs without compromising the Earth’s capacity to sustain us. The promise that makes all this possible is that as economies develop, they become more efficient in their use of resources. In other words, they decouple. There are two kinds of decoupling: relative and absolute. Relative decoupling means using less stuff with every unit of economic growth; absolute decoupling means a total reduction in the use of resources, even though the economy continues to grow. Almost all economists believe that decoupling – relative or absolute – is an inexorable feature of economic growth. Yes, the Paris climate change conference can save the planet Ed Miliband Read more On this notion rests the concept of sustainable development. It sits at the heart of the climate talks in Paris next month and of every other summit on environmental issues. But it appears to be unfounded. A paper published earlier this year in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences proposes that even the relative decoupling we claim to have achieved is an artefact of false accounting. It points out that governments and economists have measured our impacts in a way that seems irrational. Here’s how the false accounting works.

Source: Consume more, conserve more: sorry, but we just can’t do both | George Monbiot | Comment is free | The Guardian

Climate Change, Capitalism and Corporations: Processes of Creative Self-Destruction, by Christopher Wright & Daniel Nyberg

Processes of Creative Self-Destruction

Source: Climate Change, Capitalism and Corporations: Processes of Creative Self-Destruction

An extremely well-researched and readable text which includes five case studies, demonstrating the role of business and the ‘green economy’ narrative in re-capturing activists, academics and civil society in the processes of ‘creative self-destruction’. An indispensable text for anyone seeking to understand why change is so slow to happen – and why it must.

Mainstreaming new economic models – sign up for our New York event | Guardian Sustainable Business | The Guardian

Mainstreaming new economic models – sign up for our New York eventJoin us on Thursday 12 November 2015 to explore the successes and failures of neoliberal capitalism, the emergence of alternative economic models and the potential for grassroots activity to create meaningful change Demonstrators protest in Frankfurt, Germany against government austerity and capitalism earlier this year. Photograph: Michael Probst/APWednesday 7 October 2015 12.08 BST Last modified on Wednesday 7 October 2015 12.42 BSTShare on Pinterest Share on LinkedIn Share on Google+Shares100 Save for laterA growing number of individuals and organisations are questioning an economy based on limitless growth. There are two broad reasons, they argue, why such an economy is doomed to fail: firstly it exploits the people and depletes the resources it relies on to survive; secondly it is accompanied by unacceptable – even unworkable – levels of inequality, financial instability and social unrest.

Source: Mainstreaming new economic models – sign up for our New York event | Guardian Sustainable Business | The Guardian

BBC World Service – The Documentary, Company v Country

We investigate the booming and lucrative business of multinational companies suing governments. The strangely-named investor state dispute settlement (ISDS) system is built into thousands of treaties between… Read more..

via BBC World Service – The Documentary, Company v Country.

Russell Norman, New Zealand Green Party: “If you want to understand Investor State Disputes Settlement clauses in trade agreements, and how important they are, spend 26 minutes listening to this great BBC radio documentary. You will never regret it.”

The Impossibility of Growth | George Monbiot

The UK oil company Soco is now hoping to penetrate Africa’s oldest national park, Virunga, in the Democratic Republic of Congo(8); one of the last strongholds of the mountain gorilla and the okapi, of chimpanzees and forest elephants. In Britain, where a possible 4.4 billion barrels of shale oil has just been identified in the south-east(9), the government fantasises about turning the leafy suburbs into a new Niger delta. To this end it’s changing the trespass laws to enable drilling without consent and offering lavish bribes to local people(10,11). These new reserves solve nothing. They do not end our hunger for resources; they exacerbate it.The trajectory of compound growth shows that the scouring of the planet has only just begun. As the volume of the global economy expands, everywhere that contains something concentrated, unusual, precious will be sought out and exploited, its resources extracted and dispersed, the world’s diverse and differentiated marvels reduced to the same grey stubble.

via The Impossibility of Growth | George Monbiot.

Krugman: Worried About Oligarchy? You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet | Common Dreams

The world in fact has moved on a long way in the last 25 years and not in a direction you’re going to like because we are seeing not only great disparities in income and wealth, but we’re seeing them get entrenched. We’re seeing them become inequalities that will be transferred across generations. We are becoming very much the kind of society we imagine we’re nothing like.”

via Krugman: Worried About Oligarchy? You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet | Common Dreams.

Dame Anne Salmond: We could do with a change of heart – Opinion – NZ Herald News

The “invisible hand” of the market, first conceived in the Enlightenment but coupled at that time with notions of justice, human dignity and “the rights of man”, has failed to deliver prosperity and happiness, in New Zealand as elsewhere.

The problem, it seems, is a loss of balance. In the pursuit of profit, everything in the world – the earth itself, other species, knowledge and indeed, other people – has been turned into a “resource” to be exploited, often without care or conscience.

In the process, ideas of justice, truth and the common good have been undermined. Without these bulwarks, democracy falters, capitalism fails to share wealth and the distribution of income shifts dangerously out of kilter.

via Dame Anne Salmond: We could do with a change of heart – Opinion – NZ Herald News.