Scientists are turning salt water into drinking water using solar power – ScienceAlert

By inexpensively turning salt water into drinking water using sustainable solar power, a team from MIT in the US has not only come up with a portable desalination system for use anywhere in the world that needs it, but it’s just won the 2015 Desal Prize – a competition run by USAID to encourage better solutions to water shortages in developing countries. In order to win the $140,000 prize, entries had to demonstrate how their invention not only works well, but is cost-effective, environmentally sustainable, and energy efficient. And the MIT researchers teamed up with US-based manufacturing company, Jain Irrigation Systems, to do just that.

Source: Scientists are turning salt water into drinking water using solar power – ScienceAlert

Roots Up’s Dew Collector greenhouse provides veggies and water in Ethiopia Roots Up Greenhouse – Inhabitat – Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building

The dome-like greenhouse is activated when temperatures increase in the noon sun, causing water to evaporate and rise. With the humidity contained, the top point of the structure catches this evaporation before it’s able to escape into the atmosphere. As night falls, the greenhouse top is then opened by pulling the ropes attached to the latch, exposing the collected droplets to cool air.

Those droplets then cool and condense, falling into a storage cistern. The collected water can then be used for watering plants, or as safe drinking water. This system can be repeated each day, allowing plants to thrive while excess moisture is captured and saved for future use.

Related: The Globe (Hedron) Is a Geodesic Greenhouse for Urban Farmers

Instead of solely being used as a greenhouse, this can also be used as a rainwater collector, ensuring that precious raindrops are saved and stored, instead of absorbing into the ground.

Roots Up plans to launch its first series of Dew Collector greenhouses in Northern Ethiopia, in conjunction with the University of Gondar. The Dew Collector is just one part of the company‘s mission to help create a self-reliant farming community in Northern Ethiopia.

+ Roots Up

via Roots Up’s Dew Collector greenhouse provides veggies and water in Ethiopia Roots Up Greenhouse – Inhabitat – Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building.

‘What’s Possible’: The U.N. Climate Summit Opening Film | TakePart

Presented to world leaders at the 2014 United Nations Climate Summit in New York, this short inspirational film shows that climate change is solvable. We have the technology to harness nature sustainably for a clean, prosperous energy future, but only if we act now. Narrated by Morgan Freeman, What’s Possible calls on the people of the world to insist leaders get on the path of a livable climate and future for humankind.

Learn more about climate change and take action at takepart.com/climate.

What’s Possible was created by director Louie Schwartzberg, writer Scott Z. Burns, Moving Art Studio, and Lyn Davis Lear and the Lear Family Foundation. It features the creative gifts of Freeman and composer Hans Zimmer.

via ‘What’s Possible’: The U.N. Climate Summit Opening Film | TakePart.

NASA: New “impossible” engine works, could change space travel forever

Until yesterday, every physicist was laughing at this engine and its inventor, Roger Shawyer. Its called the EmDrive and everyone said it was impossible because it goes against classical mechanics. But the fact is that the quantum vacuum plasma thruster works and scientists cant explain why.Shawyers engine is extremely light and simple. It provides a thrust by “bouncing microwaves around in a closed container.” The microwaves are generated using electricity that can be provided by solar energy. No propellant is necessary, which means that this thrusters can work forever unless a hardware failure occurs. If real, this would be a major breakthrough in space propulsion technology.Obviously, the entire thing sounded preposterous to everyone. In theory, this thing shouldnt work at all. So people laughed and laughed and ignored him. Everyone except a team of Chinese scientists. They built one in 2009 and it worked: They were able to produce 720 millinewton, which is reportedly enough to build a satellite thruster. And still, nobody else believed it.Now, American scientist Guido Fetta and a team at NASA Eagleworks—the advanced propulsion skunkworks led by Dr Harold “Sonny” White at the Johnson Space Center—have published a new paper that demonstrates that a similar engine working on the same principles does indeed produce thrust. Their model, however, produces much less thrust—just 30 to 50 micronewtons. But it works, which is amazing on its own. They havent explained why their engine works, but it does work:

via NASA: New “impossible” engine works, could change space travel forever.