As new forms of fascism unfold and the world is rewritten in a strange and troubling image, there is much of which to ask, what’s it all about, Alfie?

The New Democrats are asking for an emergency debate on the immigration ban ordered by U.S. President Donald Trump.

via NDP calls for emergency debate on Donald Trump’s immigration ban —

After poisoning and dividing America, Donald Trump has won an ugly victory. The Conversation

9 November 2016
“….In truth, the sickness this election has brought to the surface has been brewing for a long time. Trump is a symptom, not just a pathogen. He has shown a genius for channelling the grievances and insecurities of those disaffected by economic and social changes in the US – primarily, though not solely, working-class whites. With this uncanny skill, he has magnified a form of identity politics the Republicans have long been using to appease and mobilise their base. This experiment in political engineering began in earnest back in the early 1990s. It was until recently an insidious thing, usually advanced via dog-whistle tactics. Trump has picked it up and turned into a blunt instrument as he doubled down on his pursuit of a core white vote and eschewed any serious appeals to minorities….”

Read the article here:

Source: After poisoning and dividing America, Donald Trump has won an ugly victory

BREAKING: Brexit Vote Roils UK, EU Climate and Energy Policy | The Energy Mix

… Britain was a staunch European leader in offshore wind production that nevertheless “firmly opposed the EU Commission’s interference in determining the national energy mix in favour of renewables. That was clearly a step backwards, since shifting towards renewable energy is an inevitable component of an effective climate mitigation strategy that is capable of drastically reducing greenhouse gas emissions.” Now, however “to achieve a positive European future, characterized by a green and low-carbon economy, state sovereignty and national self-interests are going to have to recede,” Bosak wrote. “Purely national solutions are simply not going to be enough to solve complex environmental problems, such as climate change, pollution and biodiversity loss which often pay no heed to national borders.” But Canadian energy journalist Andrew Nikiforuk counters that the Union’s size and unwieldiness has been its own undoing. “In the end, bigness—like any empire—concentrates power and delivers misery, corruption, and waste,” he writes. “And that’s the problem today with the European Union, with big corporations, large governments, and a long parade of big trade pacts.” In a “global labyrinth of bigness,” he adds, the EU “has become another symbol of oversized ineptness, along with a technological deafness that ignores locality, human temperament, culture, ecology, tradition, democracy, and diversity.” Nikiforuk cites a recent open letter that recalled the Union’s original positive promise. “There is nothing about freedom, solidarity, or friendship in the European Union. The European Union has proven to act on behalf of the interest of banks, multinational enterprises, and groups in the shadow, as advised by professional think tanks and lobbyists, not in favour of its people,” a group of Greek citizens wrote to Britons last week. “The European Union is designed as a cartel and typically, there is a lack of democratic structures and processes: democracy becomes a disturbing factor.”

Source: BREAKING: Brexit Vote Roils UK, EU Climate and Energy Policy | The Energy Mix

Antarctica shaping up as 21st century geopolitical hotspot – Nature, News, Society – NZEDGE

Antarctica shaping up as 21st century geopolitical hotspot The locale of one of today’s greatest real estate development grabs might surprise you. It’s not Dubai, Las Vegas, or Shanghai, but the frozen continent that rests at the end of the world. Writing in The New York Times in late December 2015, Simon Romero describes increased activity from various global players, including Russia building its first Orthodox church (with logs imported from Siberia), China’s plans to operate five bases (complete with indoor badminton court in its Great Wall Station), and India’s spaceship-looking Bharathi base, built on stilts and interlocking shipping containers. “An array of countries is rushing to assert greater influence here,” Romero writes, “with an eye not just toward the day those protective treaties expire, but also for the strategic and commercial opportunities that exist right now.” Why the race to the bottom? “The newest players are stepping into what they view as a treasure house of resources,” University of Canterbury School of Social and Political Sciences Professor Anne-Marie Brady told the Times. A treaty banning mining in Antarctica—which shields coveted reserves of iron ore, coal, and chromium—is expected to come up for review by 2048 and the continent’s mineral, oil, and gas deposits are all highly prized. The Times article details how researchers recently found deposits that hint at the existence of diamonds in the region and geologists estimate the area holds at least 36 billion barrels of oil and natural gas. Rather than the desolate, monolithic icescape of popular imagination, Antarctica is shaping up to be a 21st century geopolitical hotspot. Professor Brady is perhaps the world’s foremost scholar at navigating Antarctica politics. Editor of The Emerging Politics of Antarctica (2012, Routledge Advances in International Relations and Global Politics), a volume that examines the post-Cold War challenges facing the continent’s governance, Professor Brady specializes in subject matter related to the power and influence of China, New Zealand’s largest trading partner and the nation that arguably has the fastest-growing operations in Antarctica. Prof. Brady has published groundbreaking research in the field, covering China’s modern propaganda system and the nation’s relationships with Antarctica and the Pacific, as well as major revisionist histories of the Long March and of New Zealand’s national icon, Rewi Alley.

Source: Antarctica shaping up as 21st century geopolitical hotspot – Nature, News, Society – NZEDGE

Bernie Sanders Reflects on Dr. King’s Legacy with Cornel West, Killer Mike, and Nina Turner

Bernie Sanders sat down on Martin Luther King, Jr. Day with Dr. Cornel West, rapper and activist Killer Mike, and Nina Turner, the former minority whip for the Ohio Senate, to discuss Martin Luther King, Jr.’s legacy. The four discussed his life, his legacy, and the effects he had on the struggles still happening today. Several times the discussion comes back to how Dr. King’s legacy is frequently sanitized, obscuring how truly radical and outspoken his views were. Bernie sanders reflected on Dr. King’s path and how his aims expanded far beyond racial justice alone in the months leading to his death. “This is what courage is about. He said, ‘Enough.’ If he was going to be consistent with his own inner soul, he had to ask other questions. And the questions he asked, he says, I’m a man of nonviolence, but we’re living in a time of Vietnam War.” He then links Dr. King’s struggle against Vietnam and civil rights to his Poor People’s Campaign, a grassroots movement that fought for economic rights and against income inequality. Dr. Cornel West echoed this sentiment, explicitly linking this to Sander’s campaign. “I was sitting in church today, Mother Emanuel Church, and we were reading the words of Martin Luther King, Jr.,” said West. “And I said to myself, ‘This is what the Sanders campaign is about. This is what it’s about. It’s about the poor, working people. It’s about keeping track of the weak and the vulnerable. It’s about mustering the courage to tell the truth about Wall Street, about wealth inequality.”

Source: Bernie Sanders Reflects on Dr. King’s Legacy with Cornel West, Killer Mike, and Nina Turner

5 women elected for the first time in Saudi Arabia

Initial results show at least five Saudi women have won seats on local municipal councils a day after women voted and ran in elections for the first time in the country’s history.

Source: 5 women elected for the first time in Saudi Arabia

73% of Australians want Indigenous recognition in constitution – study | Australia news | The Guardian

Reposted from the Guardian:

The vast majority of Australians believe that the constitution should be changed to recognise Indigenous people, and remove clauses that discriminate on the basis of race, a study by the Australian National University found.

The telephone survey of more than 1,200 people aimed to record public opinion on injustice and social disadvantage faced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait islanders.

It found that 82% of Australians supported the removal of clauses in the constitution that discriminate on race.

And 73%, or nearly three out of four Australians believe that Indigenous Australians deserve special reference in the preamble of the founding document.

Tanya Hosch, the campaign director of Recognise, which advocates on the recognition of Indigenous Australians, said that “the strong levels of support from Australians reflect what we have heard in our own extensive community engagement across the country in the past few years.

“Australians want to fix this lack of recognition and want to fix the race discrimination in our highest legal document.”

The prime minister, Tony Abbott, has indicated that he would hold a referendum on the issue in 2017, to coincide with the 50th anniversary of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders being counted in the census.

“It’s important to get this right. Yes, we want to do it. But we want to get it right and it’s more important to get it right than to rush it,” Abbott told reporters on Friday.

“We’ve got the joint parliamentary committee, chaired by Ken Wyatt, deputy chaired by Nova Peris and that committee will be reporting in the next couple of months and that will give us a strong foundation on which to build.”

Constitutional recognition has strong bipartisan support.

via 73% of Australians want Indigenous recognition in constitution – study | Australia news | The Guardian.

How Local Communities Are Dismantling Corporate Rule | EnergyFanatics.com

In the following three short videos, Peak Moment TV interviews community rights educator Paul Cienfuegos about effective ways to prevent big corporations from destroying local family farms and our freedom using the power of Natural Law and civil law.

The power of Natural Law is something that I have been promoting for the past few months, because it is playing a very important role for helping us restore our freedom (without violent revolutions) and preventing corporations from destroying our local communities. To learn more about the power of Natural Law, read my empowering article titled Why You Need to Study Natural Law.

If you are sick and tired of the government and corporations destroying your local family farms, local stores, local communities, and the environment, I highly recommend watching the three videos in this article, so that you can see how local communities throughout the USA are standing up against corporate fascism.

Here is a summary of the interview from YouTube.com:

via How Local Communities Are Dismantling Corporate Rule | EnergyFanatics.com.

An economy that serves people and nature, not the other way around | Greens MPs

“…I am for growing natural, human, social, manufactured and financial capital and I am against growing global warming, species extinction, poverty, poor health, inequality, conflict and corruption.”

via An economy that serves people and nature, not the other way around | Greens MPs.

Fifty Years Ago: A Turning Point in Civil Rights, the 1960s and US Politics

The year 2014 has been one of highly significant 50-year anniversaries: the introduction of Lyndon Johnsons War on Poverty; passage of the Civil Rights Act; the first of the nations urban riots; Mississippi Freedom Summer; the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution, which escalated the US war in Vietnam; and Berkeleys Free Speech Movement.In many circles, 1968 is seen as the crucial turning point in which the spread of tumultuous uprisings around the world not only wrought significant social change, but also helped to generate a backlash that ushered in the neoliberal era that currently dominates the globe. I would argue, however, that the seeds for that transformation were planted via the historic events occurring in 1964.

via Fifty Years Ago: A Turning Point in Civil Rights, the 1960s and US Politics.