Resources minister touting Keystone in U.S. slams climate scientist – The Globe and Mail

n a post-speech question-and-answer session at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, the minister dropped his usual carefully measured tone to decry leading climate-change scientist James Hansen, recently retired from NASA. Developing the oil sands, Mr. Hansen has said, would mean “there is no hope of keeping carbon concentrations below 500 (parts per million), a level that would, as earth’s history shows, leave our children a climate system that is out of their control.”

The minister said such doom and gloom predictions were “exaggerated rhetoric,” that “doesn’t do the (environmentalists’) cause any good.”

“Frankly, it’s nonsense,” Mr. Oliver said, adding that Mr. Hansen “should be ashamed.”

via Resources minister touting Keystone in U.S. slams climate scientist – The Globe and Mail.

 

Frankly, its nonsense?? He knows better than the World Bank also?

World Environment News – Climate needs less U.N. talking, more market action: EU draft – Planet Ark

World Environment News – Climate needs less U.N. talking, more market action: EU draft – Planet Ark.

Totally wrong approach…

Market-driven ideology got us into this, market-driven ideology will not get us out.  
What is needed is a major change of thinking on our part. That’s you and that’s me, folks! and the time actually is right now.

Money Morning – US Facing Financial Armagedon?

The work of this team of scientists, economists, and geopolitical analysts has garnered so much attention, they were brought in front of the United Nations, UK Parliament, and numerous Fortune 500 companies to share much of their findings. Click on the short video above to see the eerie pattern.

Another member of this team, Chris Martenson, a global economic trend forecaster, former VP of a Fortune 300, and an internationally recognized expert on the dangers of exponential growth in the economy, explained their findings further:

“We found an identical pattern in our debt, total credit market, and money supply that guarantees they’re going to fail,” Martenson said. “This pattern is nearly the same as in any pyramid scheme, one that escalates exponentially fast before it collapses. Governments around the globe are chiefly responsible.”

“And what’s really disturbing about these findings is that the pattern isn’t limited to our economy. We found the same catastrophic pattern in our energy, food, and water systems as well.”

According to Martenson, these systems could all implode at the same time.

“Food, water, energy, money. Everything.”

Dr. Kent Moors, one of the world’s leading energy analysts, who advices 16 world governments on energy matters and who currently serves on two State Department task forces on energy, also voiced concerns over what he and his colleagues uncovered.

“Most frightening of all is how this exact same pattern keeps appearing in virtually every system critical to our society and way of life,” Dr. Moors stated.

via Money Morning.

Climate Economics: The State of the Art » TripleCrisis

Climate Economics: The State of the Art » TripleCrisis.

Supported by the recent World Bank report, this book refutes arguments that a more than 2 degree increase in global warming is manageable and that equilibrium will be regained.

It isn’t and it wont.

Nicholas Stern: ‘I got it wrong on climate change – it’s far, far worse’ | Environment | The Observer

Kim said there would be no solution to climate change without private sector involvement and urged companies to seize the opportunity to make profits: “There is a lot of money to be made in building the technologies and bending the arc of climate change.”

via Nicholas Stern: ‘I got it wrong on climate change – it’s far, far worse’ | Environment | The Observer.

Severe droughts in Amazon linked to climate change, says study – CBS News

Severe droughts in Amazon linked to climate change, says study – CBS News.

An area in the Amazon twice the size of California is experiencing what scientists call a “megadrought.” The prolonged drought, which began in 2005, has caused widespread damage to the area and may possibly be a sign that the rainforest is showing the first signs of large-scale degradation due to climate change.

A research team, led by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, analyzed nearly a decade of satellite data over the Amazon. The team looked at rainfall measurements and the moisture content of the forest canopy.

 

The Post-Crisis Crises

The Post-Crisis Crises.

08/01/2013 BY  9 COMMENTS

stiglitzIn the shadow of the euro crisis and America’s fiscal cliff, it is easy to ignore the global economy’s long-term problems. But, while we focus on immediate concerns, they continue to fester, and we overlook them at our peril.

The most serious is global warming. While the global economy’s weak performance has led to a corresponding slowdown in the increase in carbon emissions, it amounts to only a short respite. And we are far behind the curve: Because we have been so slow to respond to climate change, achieving the targeted limit of a two-degree (centigrade) rise in global temperature, will require sharp reductions in emissions in the future.

Some suggest that, given the economic slowdown, we should put global warming on the backburner. On the contrary, retrofitting the global economy for climate change would help to restore aggregate demand and growth.

At the same time, the pace of technological progress and globalization necessitates rapid structural changes in both developed and developing countries alike. Such changes can be traumatic, and markets often do not handle them well.

…..