Bureaucracy | reblogged from Global South

“In talking and thinking about the legacy of colonialism and imperialism in the Global South it is impossible to ignore the legacy of bureaucracy. The process of government by bureaucracy inherently creates tears in the social fabric of a society by uncoupling government from the language of rights and representation, government from governed, individual intentions from individual actions, and actions from outcomes. The ensuing social isolation and unresponsive government must be combated in order to introduce a healthy and representative political reality. Social movements among marginalized and disenfranchised people must struggle against the divisive and impersonal influence of bureaucracy and struggle to re-introduce accountability and plurality into the political sphere. Bureaucracy also necessitates a different type of healing and reconciliation, as it is often the vehicle for senseless violence and cruelty, and certainly creates conditions amenable to racism and other forms of inequality. Post-colonial political arenas must be re-humanized in order to repair the fragmentation resulting from bureaucracy…..”

via Bureaucracy | Global South.

Morgan Solar a ray of sunshine for the solar energy business | Green Energy Futures

Here’s an alternative view…

” ….The secret sauce – Morgan’s concentrated solar module

Morgan Solar is developing a concentrated solar photovoltaic module that should be ready for market by the summer of 2014. Instead of a solid panel of silicon like a typical solar module, concentrated solar uses a device to focus the light onto a tiny, ultra-efficient photovoltaic cell.

There are other concentrated solar PV companies and products out there, but the secret sauce for Morgan is in their optics. To gather and focus the light they use a lens made of cheap, everyday plastic called poly methyl methacrylate or PMMA.

“It’s used to make automotive headlamps, it’s used to make paints and it’s extremely cheap. So we’re replacing expensive semiconductor materials with really inexpensive polymer materials and that’s kind of key to reducing the cost of the raw materials that go into the solar panel,” says John Paul Morgan.

The solar cell that the light is focused on is the same stuff that’s shot into space and used to power satellites.

“One wafer would cost 400 times, 500 times more than a silicone solar cell, but it’s much, much, more efficient. And when you dice that up and when you use a tiny sliver in the middle of a concentrator, you can get superior economics,” says John Paul Morgan.

Morgan is an engineer, a physicist and is an expert in fibre optics. It’s this experience that inspired him to make a lens that redirects the incoming light 90 degrees sideways to the middle of the lens where the tiny solar cell is waiting. This means the lens used to focus the light is cheap and much thinner than its competitors….”

via Morgan Solar a ray of sunshine for the solar energy business | Green Energy Futures.

An Open Letter to Fellow Environmentalists | Deep Green Resistance New York

“I write this as an open letter to environmentalists, but to be honest, it isn’t truly an open letter. Many of you (probably most) will continue to call for these unsustainable forms of energy, despite knowing that to do so is to beg murder upon the migratory birds, the (very few remaining) unpolluted streams, rural Chinese farmers, and ultimately upon what remains of the living world. Many of you don’t want a truly sustainable way of life, but to sustain a functionally unsustainable civilization. Many of your salaries and personal identities depend on “clean energy,” and you won’t dare challenge it. And for me, this is incredibly saddening and disheartening, as I know many such people. So this letter is not written to you.”

via An Open Letter to Fellow Environmentalists | Deep Green Resistance New York.

Here is a wakeup call. One that insists we strip off the blinders and face our own delusions in order to survive.

I had heard some of these statistics, some of these uncomfortable truths, yet allowed myself to cling to the fantasy (is it? really?) of solar cells painted onto rooftops, of wind power made small scale and affordable and powering local homes in local grids .. while worrying underneath about rare minerals (yes, I own a cellphone) and migratory birds and hoping technological advances would quickly resolve these anomalies. The kicker, though, is that the same argument is used by the industrial giants against whom I want to  (and often do) rail… the Enridges, the BPs, the Shells, of this world. They, too, rely on technology to ‘solve the problem’ of carbon emissions and climate change and those billions of gallons of spilled and leaked oil contaminating our world. and so for now they continue, comfortable in their conviction that one day, some day, technology will clean it up and resolve it all.

Yes, there’s food for thought here and more research to be done. Here may be a very good starting place. But I warn you, it may make you deeply, even frighteningly, uncomfortable.

Two Births: A Gilded Arrival and a Poisoned Legacy | Global Research

Two Births: A Gilded Arrival and a Poisoned Legacy | Global Research.

On the same day, a universe away, in Falluja, Iraq – poisoned by weapons armed with uranium, chemically and radiologically toxic, and white phosphorous, a chemical weapon, and other so far unidentified “exotic weapons” – baby Humam was born. In a city relentlessly bombarded in 1991 and again in two further criminal, inhuman US decimations in 2004.

Humam was born with Retrognathia, a congenital heart disease , Omphalocele and Polydactly of upper and lower limbs. Omphalocele is an abnormality that develops as the the foetus is forming. Some of the abdominal organs protrude through an opening in the abdominal muscles in the area of the umbilical cord. Polydactly is the manifestation of extra digits on the hands or feet, in Humam’s case, both.

Humam translates as: “Brave, noble, generous.”

DailyGood: Manic Nation: Why We’re Addicted to Stress

DailyGood: Manic Nation: Why We’re Addicted to Stress

Dr. Peter Whybrow is lunching at a sushi bar near his office at the University of California, Los Angeles, but his attention is on the other diners. Even while talking to their tablemates, they are constantly distracted. They text, and repeatedly glance up at the wall-mounted TV screens. Common habits, sure. But to Whybrow, director of UCLA’s Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, those jittery behaviors are prime examples of how modern American culture has outrun the biology of our brains….”

Salient indeed… note to self..

The choice of oil or water | The Liberated Way

I discovered two springs in a wood in Hilly Fields, Colchester.  “Safe to drink?” my first reaction to the discovery, a sad reaction to the reality the human race has polluted most fresh water sources in our world.

via The choice of oil or water | The Liberated Way.

The Bombing of Nagasaki August 9, 1945: The Un-Censored Version | Global Research

68 years ago, at 11:02 am on August 9th, 1945, an all-Christian bomber crew dropped a plutonium bomb, on Nagasaki, Japan. That bomb was the second and last atomic weapon that had as its target a civilian city. Somewhat ironically, as will be elaborated upon later in this essay, Nagasaki was the most Christian city in Japan and ground zero was the largest cathedral in the Orient.

via The Bombing of Nagasaki August 9, 1945: The Un-Censored Version | Global Research.

US: The Real Global Terror Alert by Finian Cunningham | Dandelion Salad

Sixty-eight years ago this week, the United States wiped out more than 200,000 people when it dropped two atomic bombs on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.Tens of thousands more victims were to die over the ensuing years due to slow, painful deaths from cancers and birth defects.Yet the US – the only state to have ever used atomic weapons – has never apologized or made any atonement for this singularly horrific crime. Officially, the US justifies it as a legitimate attack during war even though many historical sources show that there was absolutely no military necessity for the bombings.

via US: The Real Global Terror Alert by Finian Cunningham | Dandelion Salad.

Daily digest for August 2, 2013 – makere@ualberta.ca – University of Alberta Mail

n August 2007, the Case-Shiller Home Price Index was beginning to decline, after being stuck at a plateau for most of the preceding year.  In France, BNP Paribas was about to close two investment vehicles that were heavily exposed to the US housing market.  And Northern Rock Bank was days away from the first British bank run in more than a century.  The world was on the edge of the largest economic crisis in a generation.  From the pages of Governance, here is a reading list on the crisis so far.

via Daily digest for August 2, 2013 – makere@ualberta.ca – University of Alberta Mail.