Deep Sea Mining − The Pacific Experiment | Pacific Voyagers

Canadian mining company Nautilus Minerals Inc. has staked its reputation on bringing off the world’s first deep sea mining (DSM) operation. The Bismarck Sea in Papua New Guinea has been marked out as the testing ground for this unprecedented technology. Many other companies − from Japan, China, Korea, the UK, Canada, USA, Germany and the Russian Federation − are waiting to see if Nautilus can successfully bring metals from sea floor to smelter before taking the plunge themselves.  They have already taken out exploration licenses covering over 1.5 million square kilometers of the Pacific sea floor.

This frenzy of DSM exploration is occurring in the absence of regulatory regimes or conservation areas to protect the unique and little known ecosystems of the deep sea and without meaningful consultation with the communities who will be affected by DSM.  Furthermore, scientific research into impacts remains extremely limited and provides no assurance that the health of coastal communities and the fisheries on which they depend will be guaranteed.

via Deep Sea Mining − The Pacific Experiment | Pacific Voyagers.

Author: Makere

A Maori/Scots New Zealander transplanted to Canada. Grandmother, academic, indigenous scholar, sometime singer, sometime activist, who cares passionately about our world.

2 thoughts on “Deep Sea Mining − The Pacific Experiment | Pacific Voyagers”

    1. Good question.. The UN recently passed legislation on this so I am puzzled by this. Will look for the Report on the UN action and post it as soon as I can.. There seems to be some anomalies here.. On the other hand, it would not be the first time that a large company has acted in breach of international law.. So, I’m uncertain on this point.. Sorry..

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